PAPER 185 – THE TRIAL BEFORE PILATE

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  • #9704
    Rick Warren
    Rick Warren
    Participant

    Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

    Today’s Presentation

    Paper 185 – The Trial Before Pilate

    [INTRODUCTION]

       SHORTLY after six o’clock on this Friday morning, April 7, A.D. 30, Jesus was brought before Pilate, the Roman procurator who governed Judea, Samaria, and Idumea under the immediate supervision of the legatus of Syria. The Master was taken into the presence of the Roman governor by the temple guards, bound, and was accompanied by about fifty of his accusers, including the Sanhedrist court (principally Sadduceans), Judas Iscariot, and the high priest, Caiaphas, and by the Apostle John. Annas did not appear before Pilate.

    (1987.2)185:0.2 Pilate was up and ready to receive this group of early morning callers, having been informed by those who had secured his consent, the previous evening, to employ the Roman soldiers in arresting the Son of Man, that Jesus would be early brought before him. This trial was arranged to take place in front of the praetorium, an addition to the fortress of Antonia, where Pilate and his wife made their headquarters when stopping in Jerusalem.

    (1987.3)185:0.3 Though Pilate conducted much of Jesus’ examination within the praetorium halls, the public trial was held outside on the steps leading up to the main entrance. This was a concession to the Jews, who refused to enter any gentile building where leaven might be used on this day of preparation for the Passover. Such conduct would not only render them ceremonially unclean and thereby debar them from partaking of the afternoon feast of thanksgiving but would also necessitate their subjection to purification ceremonies after sundown, before they would be eligible to partake of the Passover supper.

    (1987.4)185:0.4 Although these Jews were not at all bothered in conscience as they intrigued to effect the judicial murder of Jesus, they were nonetheless scrupulous regarding all these matters of ceremonial cleanness and traditional regularity. And these Jews have not been the only ones to fail in the recognition of high and holy obligations of a divine nature while giving meticulous attention to things of trifling importance to human welfare in both time and eternity.

     

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    [Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]

    #9705
    Rick Warren
    Rick Warren
    Participant

    .

    Greetings Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Visitors!

    WELCOME to the OPAD presentation of Paper 185. It has ten pages and eight Sections. This Paper has the details of a two hour period from around 6 to 8 am on April 7, 30 AD, the day Jesus is tried, sentenced, scourged, and crucified. He has only nine hours to live, but they will be excruciating, and not only for him! A whole universe, from Midwayers to the Divine Mother, is looking on. No doubt the Father himself must needs witness his son drink this awful cup and also divinely commiserate, perhaps even feel the pain just as deeply. It’s the most tragically beautiful drama ever in Nebadon, and very hard to endure, even today.

    The reigning Jewish authorities, the Sadducees, have already pronounced him guilty in their chambers, but they now need the Romans to approve and carry out their death sentence. Therefore must they take Jesus before the local procurator, the governor of Judea, Pontius Pilate.

    Overview of Paper 185: The Trial Before Pilate

    1. Pontius Pilate

    2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate

    3. The Private Examination by Pilate

    4. Jesus Before Herod

    5. Jesus Returns to Pilate

    6. Pilate’s Last Appeal

    7. Pilate’s Last Interview

    8. Pilate’s Tragic Surrender

    This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

    In the second and third paragraphs of the introduction the praetorium is mentioned:

    …This trial was arranged to take place in front of the praetorium, an addition to the fortress of Antonia…. (1987.2)185:0.2

    …Though Pilate conducted much of Jesus’ examination within the praetorium halls, the public trial was held outside on the steps leading up to the main entrance…. (1987.3)185:0.3

    From Wikipedia:

    In the New Testament, praetorium refers to the palace of Pontius Pilate, the Roman prefect of Judea. According to the New Testament, this is where Jesus Christ was tried and condemned to death. The Bible refers to the Praetorium as the “common hall,” the “governor’s house,” the “judgment hall,” “Pilate’s house,” and the “palace.”

    From the Gospel of John, chapter 18:

    28 Then led they Jesus from Caiaphas unto the hall of judgment: and it was early; and they themselves went not into the judgment hall, lest they should be defiled; but that they might eat the passover.

    It looks like the praetorium is a small addition to the northern corner of Antonia fortress:

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    Arrest at Olive Press in Gethsesame Park to Trial at Preatorian Hall

    MAP SOURCE

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    Wonder who the Midwayers are pointing to in this last sentence of the introduction?:

    …And these Jews have not been the only ones to fail in the recognition of high and holy obligations of a divine nature while giving meticulous attention to things of trifling importance to human welfare in both time and eternity….(1987.4)185:0.4

    Synopsis of Paper 184:

    Pontius Pilate had committed several errors early in his administration which incurred the displeasure of the emperor Tiberius. This situation gave the Judean Jewish leaders some leverage over Pilate. They had learned to use the threat of civil uprising to manipulate him.

    The Sanhedrin brought Jesus before Pilate and asked permission to have him executed. Written charges were presented: perverting the nation and stirring people to rebellion, forbidding the people to pay tribute to Caesar, claiming to be king of the Jews and founding a new kingdom.

    Jesus had not been legally convicted of any of these charges. Neither Jesus nor John responded to them when read aloud. Pilate was convinced that the proceeding was irregular and took Jesus and John into an inner chamber for a private examination.

    After dismissing the first two charges, Pilate asked Jesus if he were king of the Jews and whether he was trying to found a new kingdom. Jesus replied, “Do you not perceive that my kingdom is not of this world?” Pilate asked, “Then you are a king after all?” Jesus answered, “Yes, I am such a king, and my kingdom is the family of the faith sons of my Father who is in heaven.”

    Pilate did not understand Jesus but he was convinced that he was nothing but a harmless visionary. He went back outside and told the priests that he had questioned Jesus and found no fault in him. The crowd became angry. One of the Sanhedrin declared that Pilate would long regret letting Jesus go.

    Pilate, feeling pressured, announced that since Jesus was a Galilean he would send him to Herod, who had jurisdiction over Galilee. Jesus was brought before Herod but refused to answer Herod’s questions. Herod sent him back to Pilate.

    Pilate still wanted to set Jesus free. It had long been the custom to release a condemned man at Passover. It occurred to Pilate that he could release Jesus under this excuse. But the crowd called for the release of Barabbas, a man condemned for robbery and murder. Pilate was angry that the Jews requested mercy for a murderer instead of Jesus, but was afraid to defy the aroused Jews. “What shall I do with him who is called the king of the Jews?” And the crowd shouted, “Crucify him!” Pilate responded, “Why would you crucify this man? What evil has he done?” But they continued to cry out for his crucifixion.

    Pilate decided to try one more tactic. He ordered the guards to scourge Jesus, hoping that this punishment would be enough to appease the crowds’ anger. When the punishment ended, Pilate brought the prisoner before the crowd. The sight of the Master at this point was enough to send “a mighty shudder through the realms of a vast universe,” but the crowd continued to shout for his death. Pilate knew Jesus was innocent, but he was unwilling to defy the Jewish leaders. Pilate released Barabbas.

    Pontius Pilate’s life ended in suicide. His wife Claudia became a believer in Jesus and contributed to the spread of the gospel.

    SYNOPSIS SOURCE

    The_Urantia_Book_Word_Cloud_185_375.jpg

    WORD CLOUD OF PAPER 185

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    In tomorrow’s reading, Section 1. Pontius Pilate, the Midwayers give us a biographic profile of this weak, cowardly, “second rate” Roman governor. One whose wife became a convert!

    Listen to Paper 185: (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

    Thanks for reading. Members’ thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today’s OPAD presentation are invited.

    Much love, Rick/OPAD host.

    #9739
    Rick Warren
    Rick Warren
    Participant

    Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

    Today’s Presentation

    Paper 185 – The Trial Before Pilate

    1. Pontius Pilate

       If Pontius Pilate had not been a reasonably good governor of the minor provinces, Tiberius would hardly have suffered him to remain as procurator of Judea for ten years. Although he was a fairly good administrator, he was a moral coward. He was not a big enough man to comprehend the nature of his task as governor of the Jews. He failed to grasp the fact that these Hebrews had a real religion, a faith for which they were willing to die, and that millions upon millions of them, scattered here and there throughout the empire, looked to Jerusalem as the shrine of their faith and held the Sanhedrin in respect as the highest tribunal on earth.

    (1988.1)185:1.2 Pilate did not love the Jews, and this deep-seated hatred early began to manifest itself. Of all the Roman provinces, none was more difficult to govern than Judea. Pilate never really understood the problems involved in the management of the Jews and, therefore, very early in his experience as governor, made a series of almost fatal and well-nigh suicidal blunders. And it was these blunders that gave the Jews such power over him. When they wanted to influence his decisions, all they had to do was to threaten an uprising, and Pilate would speedily capitulate. And this apparent vacillation, or lack of moral courage, of the procurator was chiefly due to the memory of a number of controversies he had had with the Jews and because in each instance they had worsted him. The Jews knew that Pilate was afraid of them, that he feared for his position before Tiberius, and they employed this knowledge to the great disadvantage of the governor on numerous occasions.

    (1988.2)185:1.3 Pilate’s disfavor with the Jews came about as a result of a number of unfortunate encounters. First, he failed to take seriously their deep-seated prejudice against all images as symbols of idol worship. Therefore he permitted his soldiers to enter Jerusalem without removing the images of Caesar from their banners, as had been the practice of the Roman soldiers under his predecessor. A large deputation of Jews waited upon Pilate for five days, imploring him to have these images removed from the military standards. He flatly refused to grant their petition and threatened them with instant death. Pilate, himself being a skeptic, did not understand that men of strong religious feelings will not hesitate to die for their religious convictions; and therefore was he dismayed when these Jews drew themselves up defiantly before his palace, bowed their faces to the ground, and sent word that they were ready to die. Pilate then realized that he had made a threat which he was unwilling to carry out. He surrendered, ordered the images removed from the standards of his soldiers in Jerusalem, and found himself from that day on to a large extent subject to the whims of the Jewish leaders, who had in this way discovered his weakness in making threats which he feared to execute.

    (1988.3)185:1.4 Pilate subsequently determined to regain this lost prestige and accordingly had the shields of the emperor, such as were commonly used in Caesar worship, put up on the walls of Herod’s palace in Jerusalem. When the Jews protested, he was adamant. When he refused to listen to their protests, they promptly appealed to Rome, and the emperor as promptly ordered the offending shields removed. And then was Pilate held in even lower esteem than before.

    (1988.4)185:1.5 Another thing which brought him into great disfavor with the Jews was that he dared to take money from the temple treasury to pay for the construction of a new aqueduct to provide increased water supply for the millions of visitors to Jerusalem at the times of the great religious feasts. The Jews held that only the Sanhedrin could disburse the temple funds, and they never ceased to inveigh against Pilate for this presumptuous ruling. No less than a score of riots and much bloodshed resulted from this decision. The last of these serious outbreaks had to do with the slaughter of a large company of Galileans even as they worshiped at the altar.

    (1988.5)185:1.6 It is significant that, while this vacillating Roman ruler sacrificed Jesus to his fear of the Jews and to safeguard his personal position, he finally was deposed as a result of the needless slaughter of Samaritans in connection with the pretensions of a false Messiah who led troops to Mount Gerizim, where he claimed the temple vessels were buried; and fierce riots broke out when he failed to reveal the hiding place of the sacred vessels, as he had promised. As a result of this episode, the legatus of Syria ordered Pilate to Rome. Tiberius died while Pilate was on the way to Rome, and he was not reappointed as procurator of Judea. He never fully recovered from the regretful condemnation of having consented to the crucifixion of Jesus. Finding no favor in the eyes of the new emperor, he retired to the province of Lausanne, where he subsequently committed suicide.

    (1989.1)185:1.7 Claudia Procula, Pilate’s wife, had heard much of Jesus through the word of her maid-in-waiting, who was a Phoenician believer in the gospel of the kingdom. After the death of Pilate, Claudia became prominently identified with the spread of the good news.

    (1989.2)185:1.8 And all this explains much that transpired on this tragic Friday forenoon. It is easy to understand why the Jews presumed to dictate to Pilate — to get him up at six o’clock to try Jesus — and also why they did not hesitate to threaten to charge him with treason before the emperor if he dared to refuse their demands for Jesus’ death.

    (1989.3)185:1.9 A worthy Roman governor who had not become disadvantageously involved with the rulers of the Jews would never have permitted these bloodthirsty religious fanatics to bring about the death of a man whom he himself had declared to be innocent of their false charges and without fault. Rome made a great blunder, a far-reaching error in earthly affairs, when she sent the second-rate Pilate to govern Palestine. Tiberius had better have sent to the Jews the best provincial administrator in the empire.

     

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    [Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]

    #9741
    Rick Warren
    Rick Warren
    Participant

     

    .

    Greetings nelsong, Bonita, Brad, Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Guests,

    So! Tiberias was partially at fault in the Master’s death for assigning the “second rate” Pilate to rule the Jews. From the last line of today’s reading:

    …Tiberius had better have sent to the Jews the best provincial administrator in the empire….(1989.3)185:1.9

    But would Jesus’ death have been any better? Any different? Maybe, but it seems to me that the Universal Father had a point to make with this Urantian incarnation, about his willingness to suffer what many humans have to, rank unfairness and mob injustice–through his son of course.

    Secular history now affirms (since 1961 and the discovery of the Pilate Stone) Pilate was a real person. And it confirms many of the facts presented in today’s text. From Wikipedia:

    Pontius Pilate was the fifth prefect of the Roman province of Judaea, from AD 26–36. He served under Emperor Tiberius, and is best known for presiding over the trial of Jesus and ordering his crucifixion.

    The sources for Pilate’s life are an inscription known as the Pilate Stone, which confirms his historicity and establishes his title as prefect; a brief mention by Tacitus; Philo of Alexandria; Josephus; the four canonical gospels; the Gospel of Nicodemus; the Gospel of Marcion; and other apocryphal works. Based on these sources, it appears that Pilate was an equestrian of the Pontii family, and succeeded Valerius Gratus as prefect of Judaea in AD 26. Once in his post he offended the religious sensibilities of his subjects, leading to harsh criticism from Philo and Josephus.

    According to Josephus, he was ordered back to Rome after harshly suppressing a Samaritan uprising, arriving just after the death of Tiberius, which occurred on 16 March in AD 37. He was replaced by Marcellus.

    In all four gospel accounts, Pilate lobbies for Jesus to be spared his eventual fate of execution, and acquiesces only when the crowd refused to relent. He thus seeks to avoid personal responsibility for the death of Jesus. In the Gospel of Matthew, Pilate washes his hands to show that he was not responsible for the execution of Jesus and reluctantly sends him to his death. The Gospel of Mark, depicting Jesus as innocent of plotting against the Roman Empire, portrays Pilate as reluctant to execute Jesus. In the Gospel of Luke, Pilate not only agrees that Jesus did not conspire against Rome, but Herod Antipas, the Tetrarch of Galilee, also finds nothing treasonable in Jesus’ actions. In the Gospel of John, Pilate states “I find no guilt in him [Jesus],” and he asks the Jews if Jesus should be released from custody.

    Scholars have long debated how to interpret Pilate’s portrayal in the sources. The significance of the Pilate Stone, an artifact discovered in 1961 that names Pontius Pilate, is similarly debated by scholars.

    The Pilate Stone:

    1280px-Pontius_Pilate_Inscription.JPG

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    The Pilate Stone is the name given to a damaged block (82 cm x 65 cm) of carved limestone with a partially intact inscription attributed to, and mentioning, Pontius Pilate; a Prefect of the Roman-controlled province of Judaea from 26–36 AD. It was discovered in the archaeological site of Caesarea Maritima, in 1961. The artifact is particularly significant because it is the only widely accepted archaeological find, to date, of an authentic 1st-century Roman inscription mentioning the name “Pontius Pilatus”. It is contemporary to Pilate’s lifetime, and accords with what is known of his reported career. In effect, the writing constitutes the earliest surviving record and only contemporaneous evidence for the historical existence of this person; otherwise known only from the New Testament and brief mentions in retrospective Roman histories, which have themselves survived only in still-later copies.

    It is likely that Pontius Pilate made his base at Caesarea Maritima (the “governmental residence and military headquarters” beginning in 6 AD) where the stone was discovered, and travelled to Jerusalem as necessary.

    The Pilate Stone is currently located at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. Replica castings can be found at the Archaeological Museum in Milan, Italy, and on display in Caesarea Maritima itself.

    Pilate in Jewish literature

    In chronicling the history of the Roman administrators in Judaea, ancient Jewish writers Philo and Josephus describe some of the other events and incidents that took place during Pilate’s tenure. Both report that Pilate repeatedly caused near-insurrections among the Jews because of his insensitivity to Jewish customs.

    Josephus notes that while Pilate’s predecessors had respected Jewish customs by removing all images and effigies on their standards when entering Jerusalem, Pilate allowed his soldiers to bring them into the city at night. When the citizens of Jerusalem discovered these the following day, they appealed to Pilate to remove the ensigns of Caesar from the city. After five days of deliberation, Pilate had his soldiers surround the demonstrators, threatening them with death, which they were willing to accept rather than submit to desecration of Mosaic law. Pilate finally removed the images.

    Philo describes a later, similar incident in which Pilate was chastened by Emperor Tiberius after antagonizing the Jews by setting up gold-coated shields in Herod’s Palace in Jerusalem. The shields were ostensibly to honor Tiberius, and this time did not contain engraved images. Philo writes that the shields were set up “not so much to honour Tiberius as to annoy the multitude”. The Jews protested the installation of the shields at first to Pilate, and then, when he declined to remove them, by writing to Tiberius. Philo reports that upon reading the letters, Tiberius “wrote to Pilate with a host of reproaches and rebukes for his audacious violation of precedent and bade him at once take down the shields and have them transferred from the capital to Caesarea.”

    Josephus recounts another incident in which Pilate spent money from the Temple to build an aqueduct. Pilate had soldiers hidden in the crowd of Jews while addressing them and, when Jews again protested his actions he gave the signal for his soldiers to randomly attack, beat and kill – in an attempt to silence Jewish petitions.

    In describing his personality, Philo writes that Pilate had “vindictiveness and furious temper”, and was “naturally inflexible, a blend of self-will and relentlessness”. He writes that Pilate feared a delegation of the Jews might send to Tiberius protesting the gold-coated shields, because “if they actually sent an embassy they would also expose the rest of his conduct as governor by stating in full the briberies, the insults, the robberies, the outrages and wanton injuries, the executions without trial constantly repeated, the ceaseless and supremely grievous cruelty”.

    Pilate’s term as prefect of Judaea ended after an incident recounted by Josephus. A large group of Samaritans had been persuaded by an unnamed man to go to Mount Gerizim in order to see sacred artifacts allegedly buried by Moses. But at a village named Tirathana, before the crowd could ascend the mountain, Pilate sent in “a detachment of cavalry and heavy-armed infantry, who in an encounter with the firstcomers in the village slew some in a pitched battle and put the others to flight. Many prisoners were taken, of whom Pilate put to death the principal leaders and those who were most influential.”

    The Samaritans then complained to Vitellius, Roman governor of Syria, who sent Pilate to Rome to explain his actions regarding this incident to Tiberius. However, by the time Pilate got to Rome, Tiberius had died.

    SOURCE/MORE

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    In tomorrow’s reading, Section 2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate, the Sanhedrists propound Jesus’ guilt on the steps of the governor’s palace, and then specify their three accusations against him in writing. The Master looks down on this scene, not with hatred, contempt, or anger, but with “sorrowful affection and genuine pity”.

    Overview of Paper 185: The Trial Before Pilate

    1. Pontius Pilate

    2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate

    3. The Private Examination by Pilate

    4. Jesus Before Herod

    5. Jesus Returns to Pilate

    6. Pilate’s Last Appeal

    7. Pilate’s Last Interview

    8. Pilate’s Tragic Surrender

    This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

    Listen to Paper 185: (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

    Thanks for reading. Members’ thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today’s OPAD presentation are invited.

    Much love, Rick/OPAD host.

    #9824
    Rick Warren
    Rick Warren
    Participant

    Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

    Today’s Presentation

    Paper 185 – The Trial Before Pilate

    2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate

        When Jesus and his accusers had gathered in front of Pilate’s judgment hall, the Roman governor came out and, addressing the company assembled, asked, “What accusation do you bring against this fellow?” The Sadducees and councilors who had taken it upon themselves to put Jesus out of the way had determined to go before Pilate and ask for confirmation of the death sentence pronounced upon Jesus, without volunteering any definite charge. Therefore did the spokesman for the Sanhedrist court answer Pilate: “If this man were not an evildoer, we should not have delivered him up to you.”

    (1989.5)185:2.2 When Pilate observed that they were reluctant to state their charges against Jesus, although he knew they had been all night engaged in deliberations regarding his guilt, he answered them: “Since you have not agreed on any definite charges, why do you not take this man and pass judgment on him in accordance with your own laws?”

    (1989.6)185:2.3 Then spoke the clerk of the Sanhedrin court to Pilate: “It is not lawful for us to put any man to death, and this disturber of our nation is worthy to die for the things which he has said and done. Therefore have we come before you for confirmation of this decree.”

    (1989.7)185:2.4 To come before the Roman governor with this attempt at evasion discloses both the ill-will and the ill-humor of the Sanhedrists toward Jesus as well as their lack of respect for the fairness, honor, and dignity of Pilate. What effrontery for these subject citizens to appear before their provincial governor asking for a decree of execution against a man before affording him a fair trial and without even preferring definite criminal charges against him!

    (1989.8)185:2.5 Pilate knew something of Jesus’ work among the Jews, and he surmised that the charges which might be brought against him had to do with infringements of the Jewish ecclesiastical laws; therefore he sought to refer the case back to their own tribunal. Again, Pilate took delight in making them publicly confess that they were powerless to pronounce and execute the death sentence upon even one of their own race whom they had come to despise with a bitter and envious hatred.

    (1990.1)185:2.6 It was a few hours previously, shortly before midnight and after he had granted permission to use Roman soldiers in effecting the secret arrest of Jesus, that Pilate had heard further concerning Jesus and his teaching from his wife, Claudia, who was a partial convert to Judaism, and who later on became a full-fledged believer in Jesus’ gospel.

    (1990.2)185:2.7 Pilate would have liked to postpone this hearing, but he saw the Jewish leaders were determined to proceed with the case. He knew that this was not only the forenoon of preparation for the Passover, but that this day, being Friday, was also the preparation day for the Jewish Sabbath of rest and worship.

    (1990.3)185:2.8 Pilate, being keenly sensitive to the disrespectful manner of the approach of these Jews, was not willing to comply with their demands that Jesus be sentenced to death without a trial. When, therefore, he had waited a few moments for them to present their charges against the prisoner, he turned to them and said: “I will not sentence this man to death without a trial; neither will I consent to examine him until you have presented your charges against him in writing.”

    (1990.4)185:2.9 When the high priest and the others heard Pilate say this, they signaled to the clerk of the court, who then handed to Pilate the written charges against Jesus. And these charges were:

    (1990.5)185:2.10 “We find in the Sanhedrist tribunal that this man is an evildoer and a disturber of our nation in that he is guilty of:

     “1. Perverting our nation and stirring up our people to rebellion.

     “2. Forbidding the people to pay tribute to Caesar.

     “3. Calling himself the king of the Jews and teaching the founding of a new kingdom.”

    (1990.9)185:2.14 Jesus had not been regularly tried nor legally convicted on any of these charges. He did not even hear these charges when first stated, but Pilate had him brought from the praetorium, where he was in the keeping of the guards, and he insisted that these charges be repeated in Jesus’ hearing.

    (1990.10)185:2.15 When Jesus heard these accusations, he well knew that he had not been heard on these matters before the Jewish court, and so did John Zebedee and his accusers, but he made no reply to their false charges. Even when Pilate bade him answer his accusers, he opened not his mouth. Pilate was so astonished at the unfairness of the whole proceeding and so impressed by Jesus’ silent and masterly bearing that he decided to take the prisoner inside the hall and examine him privately.

    (1990.11)185:2.16 Pilate was confused in mind, fearful of the Jews in his heart, and mightily stirred in his spirit by the spectacle of Jesus’ standing there in majesty before his bloodthirsty accusers and gazing down on them, not in silent contempt, but with an expression of genuine pity and sorrowful affection.

     

     

    ***

    [Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]

    #9828
    Rick Warren
    Rick Warren
    Participant

     

    .

    Good Day Bonita, Brad, nelsong, Alina, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Visitors,

    He may be a moral coward, but Pilate seems not to have lost all feeling, all sense of what is fair and just. From today’s reading:

    …Pilate was so astonished at the unfairness of the whole proceeding and so impressed by Jesus’ silent and masterly bearing that he decided to take the prisoner inside the hall and examine him privately…. (1990.10)185:2.15

    Of course, in the end, Pilate was blinded by his pride and status, and cowed by the howling heathen hoard on his porch. Defending Jesus wasn’t worth sacrificing his position and income.

    One has to wonder if Pilate survived. If he did, he surely regretted not taking a stand against those hate-filled Sanhedrists when he had the chance. In fact he had more than one chance, but took the coward’s way out each time.

    His wife, on the other hand, not only believed Jesus’ message, she joined his followers! (We will read about her attempt to save Jesus in Section 5 of this Paper.) She is referred to in the Gospel of Matthew, but not by name.

    From Wikipedia:

    In the New Testament, the only reference to Pilate’s wife exists in a single sentence by Matthew. According to Matthew 27:19, she sent a message to her husband asking him not to condemn Jesus Christ to death:

    …While Pilate was sitting in the judgment hall, his wife sent him a message: “Have nothing to do with that innocent man, because in a dream last night, I suffered much on account of him.”

    Pilate did not heed the warning of his wife, who is not named. The name “Claudia” appears only once in the New Testament, in the Second Epistle to Timothy 4:21: “Eubulus, Pudens, Linus and Claudia send their greetings, and so all the other Christians.”

    The Catholics sainted her:

    Pontius_Pilate%27s_wife.jpg

    Icon of Saint Claudia Procles

    ***

    This appearance before Pilate has several references in the New Testament.

    From Mark 15:

    1 And straightway in the morning the chief priests held a consultation with the elders and scribes and the whole council, and bound Jesus, and carried him away, and delivered him to Pilate.

    From Matthew 27:

    12 And when he was accused of the chief priests and elders, he answered nothing.

    From Luke 23:

    1 And the whole multitude of them arose, and led him unto Pilate.

    And they began to accuse him, saying, We found this fellow perverting the nation, and forbidding to give tribute to Caesar, saying that he himself is Christ a King.

    From John 18:

    29 Pilate then went out unto them, and said, What accusation bring ye against this man?

    30 They answered and said unto him, If he were not a malefactor, we would not have delivered him up unto thee.

    31 Then said Pilate unto them, Take ye him, and judge him according to your law. The Jews therefore said unto him, It is not lawful for us to put any man to death:

    William_Hole_Jesus_Before_Pilate_400.jpg

    IMAGE SOURCE

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    Tomorrow’s reading, Section 3. The Private Examination by Pilate, tells of an indoor interview with Jesus, John ever at his side. Pilate decides Jesus is innocent, but the Sanhedrists protest vehemently. Pilate then thinks he may be able to shift the adjudication of this affair onto a neighboring governor, Herod of Galilee.

    Overview of Paper 185: The Trial Before Pilate

    1. Pontius Pilate

    2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate

    3. The Private Examination by Pilate

    4. Jesus Before Herod

    5. Jesus Returns to Pilate

    6. Pilate’s Last Appeal

    7. Pilate’s Last Interview

    8. Pilate’s Tragic Surrender

    This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

    Listen to Paper 185: (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

    Thanks for reading. Members’ thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today’s OPAD presentation are invited.

    Much love, Rick/OPAD host.

    #9836
    Bonita
    Bonita
    Participant
    Rick Warren wrote: One has to wonder if Pilate survived.
    No he did not survive.  Turns out that he was recalled from Jerusalem and sent to Rome after killing some Samaritans.  There he was exiled and sent to Gaul (France) where he eventually committed suicide in Vienne around 37AD.  This is part of the historical record of Josephus and Eusebius.

     

    #9888
    Rick Warren
    Rick Warren
    Participant
    Rick Warren wrote: One has to wonder if Pilate survived.
    No he did not survive. Turns out that he was recalled from Jerusalem and sent to Rome after killing some Samaritans. There he was exiled and sent to Gaul (France) where he eventually committed suicide in Vienne around 37AD. This is part of the historical record of Josephus and Eusebius.
    Yes, but the quandary was, did he survive in eternity?
    #9889
    Rick Warren
    Rick Warren
    Participant

    Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

    Today’s Presentation

    Paper 185 – The Trial Before Pilate

    3. The Private Examination by Pilate

       Pilate took Jesus and John Zebedee into a private chamber, leaving the guards outside in the hall, and requesting the prisoner to sit down, he sat down by his side and asked several questions. Pilate began his talk with Jesus by assuring him that he did not believe the first count against him: that he was a perverter of the nation and an inciter to rebellion. Then he asked, “Did you ever teach that tribute should be refused Caesar?” Jesus, pointing to John, said, “Ask him or any other man who has heard my teaching.” Then Pilate questioned John about this matter of tribute, and John testified concerning his Master’s teaching and explained that Jesus and his apostles paid taxes both to Caesar and to the temple. When Pilate had questioned John, he said, “See that you tell no man that I talked with you.” And John never did reveal this matter.

    (1991.2)185:3.2 Pilate then turned around to question Jesus further, saying: “And now about the third accusation against you, are you the king of the Jews?” Since there was a tone of possibly sincere inquiry in Pilate’s voice, Jesus smiled on the procurator and said: “Pilate, do you ask this for yourself, or do you take this question from these others, my accusers?” Whereupon, in a tone of partial indignation, the governor answered: “Am I a Jew? Your own people and the chief priests delivered you up and asked me to sentence you to death. I question the validity of their charges and am only trying to find out for myself what you have done. Tell me, have you said that you are the king of the Jews, and have you sought to found a new kingdom?”

    (1991.3)185:3.3 Then said Jesus to Pilate: “Do you not perceive that my kingdom is not of this world? If my kingdom were of this world, surely would my disciples fight that I should not be delivered into the hands of the Jews. My presence here before you in these bonds is sufficient to show all men that my kingdom is a spiritual dominion, even the brotherhood of men who, through faith and by love, have become the sons of God. And this salvation is for the gentile as well as for the Jew.”

    (1991.4)185:3.4 “Then you are a king after all?” said Pilate. And Jesus answered: “Yes, I am such a king, and my kingdom is the family of the faith sons of my Father who is in heaven. For this purpose was I born into this world, even that I should show my Father to all men and bear witness to the truth of God. And even now do I declare to you that every one who loves the truth hears my voice.”

    (1991.5)185:3.5 Then said Pilate, half in ridicule and half in sincerity, “Truth, what is truth — who knows?”

    (1991.6)185:3.6 Pilate was not able to fathom Jesus’ words, nor was he able to understand the nature of his spiritual kingdom, but he was now certain that the prisoner had done nothing worthy of death. One look at Jesus, face to face, was enough to convince even Pilate that this gentle and weary, but majestic and upright, man was no wild and dangerous revolutionary who aspired to establish himself on the temporal throne of Israel. Pilate thought he understood something of what Jesus meant when he called himself a king, for he was familiar with the teachings of the Stoics, who declared that “the wise man is king.” Pilate was thoroughly convinced that, instead of being a dangerous seditionmonger, Jesus was nothing more or less than a harmless visionary, an innocent fanatic.

    (1991.7)185:3.7 After questioning the Master, Pilate went back to the chief priests and the accusers of Jesus and said: “I have examined this man, and I find no fault in him. I do not think he is guilty of the charges you have made against him; I think he ought to be set free.” And when the Jews heard this, they were moved with great anger, so much so that they wildly shouted that Jesus should die; and one of the Sanhedrists boldly stepped up by the side of Pilate, saying: “This man stirs up the people, beginning in Galilee and continuing throughout all Judea. He is a mischief-maker and an evildoer. You will long regret it if you let this wicked man go free.”

    (1992.1)185:3.8 Pilate was hard pressed to know what to do with Jesus; therefore, when he heard them say that he began his work in Galilee, he thought to avoid the responsibility of deciding the case, at least to gain time for thought, by sending Jesus to appear before Herod, who was then in the city attending the Passover. Pilate also thought that this gesture would help to antidote some of the bitter feeling which had existed for some time between himself and Herod, due to numerous misunderstandings over matters of jurisdiction.

    (1992.2)185:3.9 Pilate, calling the guards, said: “This man is a Galilean. Take him forthwith to Herod, and when he has examined him, report his findings to me.” And they took Jesus to Herod.

     

    ***

    [Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]

    #9890
    Rick Warren
    Rick Warren
    Participant

     

    .

    Greetings Bonita, Brad, nelsong, Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Guests,

    Hmm…Why did Pilate make this request?

    …See that you tell no man that I talked with you.” And John never did reveal this matter…. (1991.1)185:3.1

    ***

    The irony of this statement from Pilate would be humorous if the situation were not so deadly and evil:

    …Then said Pilate, half in ridicule and half in sincerity, “Truth, what is truth — who knows?” (1991.5)185:3.5

    The Living Truth of a universe was in Pilate’s presence and he asks: What is truth?

    William_Hole_Art_Thou_King_Of_The_Jews_4

    IMAGE SOURCE

    Some sources attribute this quote in today’s reading:

    …he was familiar with the teachings of the Stoics, who declared that “the wise man is king….” (1991.6)185:3.6

    …to Zeno of Elea, others to Clement of Alexandria:

    …And this arrangement was prophetical and typical. And that all things belong to the wise, Scripture clearly indicates when it is said, “Because God hath had mercy on me, I have all things.” For it teaches that we are to desire one thing, by which are all things, and what is promised is assigned to the worthy. Accordingly, the good man who has become heir of the kingdom, it registers also as fellow-citizen, through divine wisdom, with the righteous of the olden time, who under the law and before the law lived according to law, whose deeds have become laws to us; and again, teaching that the wise man is king, introduces people of a different race, saying to him, “Thou art a king before God among us;” those who were governed obeying the good man of their own accord, from admiration of his virtue.

    Source/more

    ***

    The four Gospel records all have something about this interview. As it should be, John has the most and is the closest to the facts. The editors of the other three must have copied John since he was the only one there.

    From John 18:

    33 Then Pilate entered into the judgment hall again, and called Jesus, and said unto him, Art thou the King of the Jews?

    34 Jesus answered him, Sayest thou this thing of thyself, or did others tell it thee of me?

    35 Pilate answered, Am I a Jew? Thine own nation and the chief priests have delivered thee unto me: what hast thou done?

    36 Jesus answered, My kingdom is not of this world: if my kingdom were of this world, then would my servants fight, that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now is my kingdom not from hence.

    37 Pilate therefore said unto him, Art thou a king then? Jesus answered, Thou sayest that I am a king. To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth. Every one that is of the truth heareth my voice.

    38 Pilate saith unto him, What is truth? And when he had said this, he went out again unto the Jews, and saith unto them, I find in him no fault at all.

    From Mark 15:

    And Pilate asked him, Art thou the King of the Jews? And he answering said unto them, Thou sayest it.

    And the chief priests accused him of many things: but he answered nothing.

    And Pilate asked him again, saying, Answerest thou nothing? behold how many things they witness against thee.

    But Jesus yet answered nothing; so that Pilate marvelled.

    From Luke 23:

    And Pilate asked him, saying, Art thou the King of the Jews? And he answered him and said, Thou sayest it.

    Then said Pilate to the chief priests and to the people, I find no fault in this man.

    And they were the more fierce, saying, He stirreth up the people, teaching throughout all Jewry, beginning from Galilee to this place.

    When Pilate heard of Galilee, he asked whether the man were a Galilaean.

    And as soon as he knew that he belonged unto Herod’s jurisdiction, he sent him to Herod, who himself also was at Jerusalem at that time.

    From Matthew 27:

    11 And Jesus stood before the governor: and the governor asked him, saying, Art thou the King of the Jews? And Jesus said unto him, Thou sayest.

    12 And when he was accused of the chief priests and elders, he answered nothing.

    13 Then said Pilate unto him, Hearest thou not how many things they witness against thee?

    14 And he answered him to never a word; insomuch that the governor marvelled greatly.

    ***

    Tomorrow’s reading, Section 4. Jesus Before Herod, is mostly about Jesus’ silence before the Galilean governor, who does nothing but question and ridicule the Master, then sends him back to Pilate in an old robe as a mock king.

    Overview of Paper 185: The Trial Before Pilate

    1. Pontius Pilate

    2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate

    3. The Private Examination by Pilate

    4. Jesus Before Herod

    5. Jesus Returns to Pilate

    6. Pilate’s Last Appeal

    7. Pilate’s Last Interview

    8. Pilate’s Tragic Surrender

    This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

    Listen to Paper 185: (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

    Thanks for reading. Members’ thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today’s OPAD presentation are invited.

    Much love, Rick/OPAD host.

    #9892
    Bonita
    Bonita
    Participant

    Yes, but the quandary was, did he survive in eternity?

    Didn’t Jesus ask God to forgive him?  “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.”  Seems to me that everyone would be forgiven and have an opportunity to learn from their error.  

    #9894
    Rick Warren
    Rick Warren
    Participant

     

    Didn’t Jesus ask God to forgive him? “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.” Seems to me that everyone would be forgiven and have an opportunity to learn from their error.

     

    Let’s hope, I have a basketful of unforgivable errors…no, a shipload. :-)

    Won’t it be strange to perhaps meet the apostles, and others who had roles in this the greatest dramatic climax of all!?! “Pleased to meet you, Pontius. Ordered any scourgings lately?”

    If he survived, or is still sleeping, I’d like to think I would be mature enough to see a fellow error maker, forgiven and forgotten. Who can say his errors were worse than mine?

    #9896
    Bonita
    Bonita
    Participant

    Let’s hope, I have a basketful of unforgivable errors…no, a shipload.

    Don’t you mean forgivable errors?

    I’d like to think I would be mature enough to see a fellow error maker, forgiven and forgotten. Who can say his errors were worse than mine?

    I think you only remember that which is worthy of remembering.  Only value survives.  I suppose there are those who can recall your errors for you, if you ask. But recalling other people’s errors? I don’t know.  I would think that it would be their business.  I’m sure if you ran into Pilate, you wouldn’t relate to him in an unloving way.  If you did, you’d probably have to do some rehab.  I don’t think you can get away with that sort of thing on mansonia . . .  at least I hope not.

    #9899
    Rick Warren
    Rick Warren
    Participant

    I think you only remember that which is worthy of remembering. Only value survives. I suppose there are those who can recall your errors for you, if you ask. But recalling other people’s errors? I don’t know. I would think that it would be their business. I’m sure if you ran into Pilate, you wouldn’t relate to him in an unloving way. If you did, you’d probably have to do some rehab. I don’t think you can get away with that sort of thing on mansonia . . . at least I hope not.

    Hmm…yeah. Rehab.

     

     

    #9931
    Avatar
    nelsong
    Participant

    If he survived, or is still sleeping

     

    Interesting thought as the end of a dispensation was just around the corner, no?

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